Player Profile: A Look At The Greatness That Is Andrew Miller

Sports and Bets — October 6, 2014 at 1:43 pm by

The Orioles pulled off a trade mid-season to bring in former Red Sox reliever Andrew Miller. At the time, I loved acquiring Miller, but I didn’t like the price we had to pay to get him. We gave up a highly respected starting pitching prospect in Eduardo Rodriguez, which was a move I expect to haunt us a few years down the road, when he will likely become a quality starter in the big leagues. Rodriguez was not having a great year in the minor leagues, but according to all scouts the upside he had was undeniable.

All that being said, there’s no doubt Andrew Miller is one of the best relievers in the entire major leagues, so everyone knew this trade would help the O’s win ball games this year with the hopes of making a strong postseason run. Miller has been inserted into the biggest games of the year for the O’s, and has succeeded time and time again. In fact, there’s no doubt that without him, that the Orioles would not be as serious of a championship contender as they are. Miller took one of the league’s best bullpens, and strengthened it even more. He has been nothing short of exceptional for us since the day we got him. I’ve grown to have a pretty big man crush on the guy, and I think he deserves as much recognition as possible for the outstanding job he’s done.miller

Andrew Miller made his big league debut in 2007 for the very same Detroit Tigers team that he just picked apart this series. The Tigers drafted him 6th overall in 2006, before they traded him away in December of 2007 as part of a package deal that brought Miguel Cabrera to the Tigers, along with Dontrelle Willis. If you’re a Tigers fan, you can’t exactly be mad for trading Miller away, seeing what you got in return.

After the 2010 season, the Marlins traded Miller to the Boston Red Sox, for reliever Dustin Richardson. Miller spent his first two years in the Red Sox organization as a starter, but when called him up from the minors after rehabbing an injury in 2012, the Red Sox moved him to the bullpen, where he has succeeded in his role ever since.

The Orioles faced Miller numerous times while he was with the Red Sox, and I can’t remember us ever having success against him, which must have impressed Showalter and Dan Duquette so much that they were willing to give up one of our top pitching prospects to get him.

Miller is a free agent after this year, so it remains very possible his time with the Orioles is limited. For as many free agents as the Orioles are going to have this offseason and the next, Miller has to be one of the most important players to keep. The value a team will get for signing him will be immense. It’s likely Nelson Cruz will be making around 20 million a year wherever he plays next year, and if he’s anything like what he has been this year, he’ll be worth every penny. But according to NESN.com, Andrew Miller could be signed for around a three year, 21 million dollar deal. That would put him at 7 million per season, which is much more of a realistic signing for the Birds. I would have to think that he’ll end up signing for slightly higher than that, seeing his value to a team in the postseason, but even if he was given a contract anywhere close to that, you’ll get incredible return on your investment.

Whichever team signs Miller next year will get a huge bargain for what he will help their franchise do. I say we need to start a campaign to keep Miller here in Baltimore, because he’s just as valuable as any position player in my book, at a fraction of the price.

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But for now he’s an Oriole, and let’s enjoy watching him on this playoff run, and when all is said and done this month, hopefully the 6’7” 29-year-old lefty will be wearing a World Series Ring with the Orioles’ name on it.

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